Getting Real With Shadra Bruce

Sex is an important part of a healthy, committed relationship. Unfortunately, there are a number of complications that can get in the way of a healthy sex life and interrupt the intimacy and passion you have with your partner. If you are having issues that are preventing you from having the sex life with your partner that you want and need – and that he or she wants and needs – you can discover ways to keep your passion alive. Even if your issues are constantly present or you are miserable and in pain and not really thinking about sex the way you would be if you felt fine, there are ways you can continue to have a healthy and mutually satisfying sex life.

file000100531136When you’re in a committed relationship, it isn’t just about the pursuit of an orgasm. Sex is also about intimacy and connection and closeness and love. When you can’t have that intimacy, it’s much easier to feel disconnected from your partner in every way, not just sexually.

How to Support a Partner Who Is Having Sexual Health Problems

It takes both partners to work through these times. Be supportive when your partner is in pain, doesn’t feel sexy, feels like his or her insides have been twisted into carnival rides, or just can’t find the inspiration to be sensual or sexual. If you are suffering from a sexual health issue, try to put your woes aside and find other ways to let your partner know you’re still madly, hotly passionate about him or her.

If you have a partner struggling with a sexual health problem, don’t push or demand or pout about the necessary non-sex you’re having. That makes it easier for him or her to want to find ways (and believe me, there are many other ways) to make you feel good and to keep your sensuality and intimacy alive. Spend more time cuddling and caressing, kissing and fondling, teasing and flirting.

How to Be a Good Partner When You’re Having Sexual Health Issues

If you are struggling with a sexual health issue, from polycystic ovarian disease to prostate troubles, from post-menopausal lack of libido to impotence, try to find some way every day to let your partner know that even though you’d rather have your doctor remove everything from your lower body that is remotely sexual right now, your partner is still someone you are attracted to and find sexy. When you feel horrible, let your partner care for you. When he or she needs reassurance, be sure to provide it.

A loving relationship does not need sex to thrive, but it does need intimacy.