wine for dinnerThere are many fad diets out there, most targeted specifically at women. Lose 10 pounds in one week, shrink belly fat, and get toned by consuming strange mixtures of maple syrup and cayenne pepper and who knows what else. Fad diets all promise the same thing: they all offer quick fixes to a goal that takes long-term dedication.

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The first problem with fad diets is that they don’t take into account individual differences. One type of diet, such as Paleo, might work for one person but it certainly isn’t going to work for everyone. The other problem is that many fad diets constrict your diet to an extreme extent. I don’t know about you, but the second I’m told I can’t have something it’s literally all I want. So cravings and binge eating tends to become a huge issue surrounding fad diets.

The other thing that fad diets fail to emphasize is exercise. You can cut all the calories in the world, but you aren’t going to reach a healthy place. And that goes both ways. Simply because you hit the gym that morning does not mean you can swing through McDonalds for dinner every night. Healthy eating and exercise go hand in hand.

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Ultimately, you have to do some experimenting to decide what is right for your body and lifestyle. You may not have time for the gym, but maybe you can take a walk with your dog or partner. If lunch out is a huge draw, pack healthy snacks and meals that you can look forward to. Feel it out and choose what works for you, because if you don’t like it, you won’t stick with it.

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